Category archives for: Backcountry

SigAlert canceled for SR-78 at Horizon View

Monday, 4:17 p.m.—CHP reports that the Sig Alert has been canceled for state Route 78 west of Horizon View where an accident occurred.

Monday, 4 p.m. —A Sig Alert has been issued on state Route 78 at Horizon View due to a traffic collision with a major injury, reports California Highway Patrol.

Both lanes on SR-78 are blocked, states the CHP website. The Sig Alert is estimated to last until around 4:45 p.m.

San Diego County invites public to MSCP workshop

The county will conduct its Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP) Annual Report Workshop at 9 a.m., Tuesday, July 22, at its operations center, 5520 Overland Ave., San Diego.

Residents are invited to learn about regional habitat conservation accomplishments and goals, according to the county. Local jurisdictions and state and federal agencies will give an update on lands preserved for the approved MSCP and on MSCP projects completed in 2013 in the southwest portion of the count

Trash truck hits tree branch, triggering Mussey Grade Road closure

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A trash truck collided with a large oak tree branch leaning over Mussey Grade Road this afternoon, causing the roadway to be covered with branches and limbs and impassable until the county can clear it.

The collision occurred around 2:30 p.m. just past Dos Picos Park Road.

JoBeth Lytle, road supervisor for the county’s Ramona road station, estimated the road won’t be cleared for traffic until about 6:30 p.m.

Water authority dedicates higher San Vicente Dam

San Diego County Water Authority dedicated its new higher dam at the San Vicente Reservoir Thursday morning.
The three-year, $416 million construction project to raise the San Vicente Dam by 117 feet was essentially completed in June, water authority spokesman Mike Lee said. The dam is now 337 feet high.
The water authority also constructed a surge tank, a pump station and 11 miles of large-diameter pipeline, which together cost another $400 million or so, according to Lee.
The extra water in the reservoir will be able to supply 300,000 homes annually. It will also give the county extra water in case of emergency.
The water authority expects it to take between two and five years to refill the reservoir to its new level, depending on rainfall, the availability of imported water and local demand. The body of water will remain closed to recreational use until it reaches the level of a new boat ramp.

Cleveland National Forest to tighten fire restrictions

Due to high temperatures and dry vegetation in the eastern reaches of San Diego County, fire restrictions in Cleveland National Forest will increase to an elevated level, effective 6 a.m. Friday, forestry officials announced.
Under the stricter rules, wood or charcoal fires are allowed only in designated areas, and smoking is prohibited except inside vehicles or buildings or within a developed recreation site.
The restrictions also require spark arrestors on off-highway vehicles, chainsaws and other equipment with internal-combustion engines, and mandate special-use permits for welding, grinding, cutting, use of explosives and similar activities.
Fireworks are never allowed on state lands.
The fire-danger rating system takes into account such factors as foliage conditions and expected weather effects on fuels to establish the likelihood of a fire starting within a given 24-hour period.
“The public needs to be extremely careful when recreating within the forest during periods of high, very high and extreme fire danger,” said Carlton Joseph, fire chief for Cleveland National Forest.

Proposed changes affect homestays, farmers’ markets, microbreweries

Proposed amendments to the county’s zoning ordinance that include changes related to agricultural areas are available for public review and comments until Aug. 11.

County Planning and Development Services released the California Environmental Quality Act public review of the zoning ordinance on June 26. It is available at www.sdcounty.ca.gov/pds/ceqa_public_review.html and in Ramona Library, 1275 Main St.

County plans to lease a fire-attack helicopter for two months this fall

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County officials plan to lease a fire-attack helicopter this fall to respond to wildfires. The contract guarantees exclusive use of the aircraft for two months.

“This will significantly bolster our immediate response capabilities during the weeks when we typically see our strongest Santa Ana wind events,” Holly Crawford, county emergency services director, told the San Diego County Board of Supervisors as it voted yesterday to terminate an emergency declaration it enacted during the May wildfires.

Hams host Field Day in Ramona

Amateur radio operators, nicknamed “hams,” have long communicated with each other without the benefit of the Internet, cell phone towers or other infrastructure. Those wondering how they do it have their chance.
Ramona Outback Amateur Radio Society (ROARS) will host Field Day, a 24-hour event beginning Saturday, June 28. The mission is national. All club members aim to talk to as many people around the world as possible, using various forms of radio equipment.
The public is invited to join the experienced radio operators. A “GOTA” station — Get on the Air — will be set up so that those with new licenses, or even adults or children without licenses, can understand what talking over the airwaves is all about.
“One of our goals is for the public to learn what we do, why we do it, and how we do it, so having someone try out ham radio for the first time is fun for everyone,” said Richard Elling, ROARS member.
Hams can provide communications in times of emergency or disaster, when the usual lines of communication are unavailable. During the past Ramona wildfires, for example, hams provided backup communications for the American Red Cross, the Salvation Army and more.
ROARS Field Day will be at Ramona Fire Station 82 at 3410 Dye Road. The event will begin at 9 a.m. Saturdy and end on Sunday at noon. For more information, visit www.roars.net.

 

SDG&E can meet summer demands, but conservation needed during heat waves and unplanned outages, say utility leaders

Electrical supplies will be adequate in San Diego and southern Orange counties this summer, but conservation will be needed during heat waves or unplanned power plant outages, San Diego Gas & Electric announced today.

“SDGE is prepared to meet this summer’s energy demand but we expect that there will be days when we will need help from customers through conservation and demand response, and we appreciate all efforts by our customers so far this year to help keep the electric system running smoothly during the recent wildfires,” said Steven Davis, SDG&E president and chief operating officer.

Still no sign of missing Ramona man

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Law enforcement and search and rescue teams continue to look for Carl Salayer, a 67-year-old Ramona man who has Alzheimer’s disease and has been missing since early Tuesday morning from his home on Handlebar Road. Above, a group meets at the command post set up at the corner of Highland Valley and Handlebar roads. Salayer was reported missing by family members around 8 a.m. Tuesday and may be wearing only undergarments. The sheriff’s department asks that residents in that area thoroughly check all structures on their properties and if they see him to call 911.

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