Category archives for: Editorial

Letter to editor: Reasons to support Measure Q

I support Measure Q — Quality Schools for Ramona — because I care about our community. My husband and I moved here 36 years ago because we wanted to raise our family in a place with good, old-fashioned American values and traditions: neighbor helping neighbor, patriotic devotion, and a commitment to future generations.

Letter to editor: Borrowing to repay debt is risky business, poor management

Measure Q is full of double-talk. Let’s be honest. It’s not about quality education or students. It’s about a loan coming due and no money to pay it. Ramona Unified School District owes $25 million plus other obligations. The total is said to be $32 million.

Letter to editor: Acknowledge your resentments, try to forgive, and vote Yes on Q

I reckon that the men and women of the VFW in Ramona are not ignorant of the past mistakes of the RUSD governance team. I’m sure they are aware that some fellow Ramonans feel betrayed by the RUSD Board taking on this huge debt in spite of voters voting no a decade ago.

Letter to editor: All VFW members should have been polled on Q

Recently Doug Scholl had a letter published in the Ramona Sentinel which stated that our Ramona VFW Post supported the upcoming Proposition Q. I would like to let Doug Scholl know that not all VFW members support Prop Q. Why would one vote for higher property taxes?

Letter to editor: Troubles about lack of U.S. flags on Main Street

Thought I would write about an item that has been troubling me for the past few years. I have been a member of the Ramona Chamber of Commerce’s Economic Development Committee for several years now and I recall a few years back with the support and special pricing of Ransom Bros. Hardware, our committee was able to walk up and down Main Street offering the discounted U.S. flag kits and we had our tools with us and even installed them on the spot for the merchants who wished. We probably installed some 15 flag kits

Letters to editor

The debate over the pending school bond has included some bizarre and misleading ideas: that the bond is an implied left-wing conspiracy to perpetuate big government, that the school district is sitting on a pile of money, that the bond is undemocratic, that we were mismanaged into this crisis and shouldn’t reward that behavior.

Newspapers — the ‘tie that binds’

What do you care most about in life?

Most of us would put family at, or near, the top of such a list. Friends would be there. So would our jobs or businesses, our livelihoods. Our homes. Maybe our pets. Our hobbies and pastimes. Add in those around us: Neighbors, the community, etc.

Letter: Accolades to road project manager and crew

Accolades to Michael Long, San Vicente Road project manager, and his crew for being so sympathetic towards Ramona residents. He has agreed to preserve “Cedar Dog” and has asked that residents remove their memorials before the work is started.

What a wonderful, caring thing to do.

Letters to editor: Publicity turns gem into tourist trap; good news for Ramona Tea’d

As a long-time resident of Ramona, I’ve spent countless hours hiking, biking, and enjoying our backcountry gems, Mount Woodson in particular. In the past 15 years I’ve logged over 2,000 trips to the top on my mountain bike and have spent several hours erasing graffiti from the rocks, not to mention occasionally collecting trash that others leave behind.

In short, I have an emotional investment in preserving the natural beauty of Mount Woodson.

No more endorsements

Once upon a time, before absentee balloting became the preferred way for voters to express their candidate preferences, newspaper publishers and editors would spend considerable time and energy on offering ballot recommendations to their readers.
That tradition dates back to days long before the Internet, when most of the information gained by voters about those seeking pubic office would be found in printed media. The thinking behind making newspaper endorsements went something like, “We have been covering the campaigns and the issues, we have met in person with the candidates, and we’d like to offer our considered opinions as to who should be elected.” The endorsements typically were printed a week or so before Election Day.
That was then, this is now. The practice of good citizens waiting until Election Day to cast the ballots has changed. Now a majority of all ballots cast in San Diego County are done through the mail. Of ballots cast in the low-turnout June primary, 73 percent were by absentee. The November 2012 election saw 56 percent of the voting done by mail.
Absentee ballots are mailed 29 days before Election Day. For our endorsements to have any relevance, they would have to be printed four weeks before Election Day. That, in our opinion, is much too early. A lot can happen during those four weeks. Candidates can (and do) stumble.
Early endorsements might also open us up to allegations that coverage of an endorsed candidate might be “slanted” toward his or her election success. That would never happen here, but perception is seldom influenced by facts.
For these reasons, we have decided to no longer endorse candidates for political office. It is the end of a long tradition here, but one that needs to be ended.
We encourage our readers to do their own research on candidates running for office. Read us for profiles on local candidates and coverage of public candidate forums. Study our reports on how their campaigns are financed. Be skeptical of all campaign literature. Dig a little deeper. Be informed, and cast an intelligent ballot.

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