Category archives for: Country Living

Storm shifts livestock auction, drenches country fair

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As drizzle turned to downpour Saturday afternoon, temporarily shutting down the livestock auction, Ramona Junior Fair participants didn’t miss a beat.

They sent their buyers across the street for an early dinner in the community center as they and their adult leaders pulled together to move the auction to the beef barn that has a covered roof.

Country Fair gets under way today, promises Four Best Days of Summer

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Contests, tournaments, carnival rides, live entertainment, games, a food court, and lots of vendors will fill the outdoor community center when Ramona Chamber of Commerce kicks off what’s been called the Four Best Days of Summer on Thursday.

The 44th Annual Ramona Country Fair at 431 Aqua Lane coincides with the Ramona Junior Fair next door, giving residents and visitors a taste of Americana and four days of old-fashioned summer fun. Presented by the Ramona chamber, the country fair features a photography contest on Foto Friday, Home Sweet Home Country Canning Contest on Saturday, and the fourth annual Valley of the Sun Pitchers Duel Horseshoe Tournament on Saturday. Carnival rides and games will be ongoing from July 31 through Aug. 3.

Live entertainment will be on two stages, and the fair also boasts the Ramona Idol singing contest, a craft and

Where are they now? ‘Country girl’ defends rights and gives second chances

Add slight color. Crop.

Christina (Chrissy Kapelczak) Oleson works in a field that she finds rewarding but, she said, it does not attract a lot of women and is often viewed negatively.

“What I do is help people get a second chance,” she said of her profession as a criminal defense attorney.

The 1999 Ramona High School graduate said that at a young age she knew she wanted to be an attorney.

Ramona Junior Fair continues Sunday

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Ramona Junior Fair continues Sunday with goats, llamas, alpacas and horses.

The 43rd annual junior fair opened today at Ramona Junior Fairgrounds, 431 Aqua Lane, with a dog show, rabbit and cavy show and home economics judging.

A highlight of the 10-day fair for 4-H and FFA participants is the livestock auction slated to begin Saturday at 1 p.m.

Two squirrels test positive for plague on Palomar Mountain

Two squirrels captured on Palomar Mountain for routine monitoring tested positive for plague, county officials said today.

The squirrels were trapped at the Camp Palomar Outdoor School, which is undergoing maintenance and is not scheduled to be used by campers until Aug. 25, according to the county Department of Environmental Health.

County reminds hikers to take precautions in summer’s heat

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With summer temperatures rising and the death this week of a teenage hiker who suffered from heat-related physical distress, the county reminds residents to take precautions when planning to enjoy the area’s mountains or other backcountry attractions.

On Tuesday, an 18-year-old female hiker died after she was airlifted out of an area on the Three Sisters Falls trails in Julian, reported San Diego County Sheriff’s Department. The County Medical Examiner identified her as Yasmen Vidales of San Diego.

Gardening: Big harvests begin with small supply list

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As a 20-plus year veteran of Ramona gardening, Maggie Johnson knows what it takes to be successful in our climate. She grows a large variety of vegetables and herbs that she features in her exotic ethnic cuisine.

But no matter what type of food you enjoy, gardening can involve as much—or as little—investment in supplies as the gardener wishes. For the time and money involved, vegetable gardeners reap what they sow, enjoying the benefits of fresh taste and personal achievement.

County reports first West Nile virus case in region

Monday, July 21— The first human case of the potentially fatal West Nile virus in two years in San Diego County was reported today by the county Health and Human Services Agency.
The infection in a 43-year-old Santee man was found during screen of blood he donated. He had experienced no symptoms, which is not unusual for the disease, which is spread by mosquitoes.
The man, who went camping outside the state the week before his blood was drawn, did not recall any recent mosquito bites, according to the county health agency.
“Even though it’s most likely this individual acquired West Nile outside of the county, we know the virus is here in San Diego County,” said Dr. Wilma Wooten, the county’s public health officer.
County Vector Control collected a dead crow in the city of San Diego last week that has also tested positive for West Nile, said Wooten.
“It’s important for the public to know West Nile virus is a dangerous and potentially deadly disease,” she said.
The Vector Control program, part of the county Department of Environmental Health, is inspecting for potential mosquito breeding locations near the man’s home and setting up mosquito monitoring traps in the surrounding areas of Santee.
The state Department of Public Health reported 15 West Nile virus-related fatalities in the state last year, but there have been no deaths in the 11 human cases confirmed so far this season.
Most people are infected with the virus from June through October, with the peak season in August and September.
Of those who become infected with West Nile virus, 80 percent will have no symptoms, according to the county. About one in five people who are infected will develop only a mild illness that includes a headache, fever, nausea, fatigue, skin rash or swollen glands.
One in 150 will suffer serious neurologic complications that can become life-threatening. The risk of complications increases for those over age 50, and for people with weakened immune systems.
The county encourages residents to prevent mosquito breeding by dumping or removing backyard items that can hold water, such as plant saucers, rain gutters, buckets, garbage cans, toys, old tires and wheelbarrows.
Mosquito fish, available for free from Vector Control, can be used to control breeding of the insect in water sources such as neglected swimming pools, ponds, fountains and water troughs.
Health agency officials said residents can protect against mosquito bites by staying inside when they are most active, between dusk and dawn, and by wearing long sleeves and pants when outdoors. An insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin, oil of eucalyptus or IR3535 can be applied before going outside.
Window and door screens should be checked to make sure they are in good condition and secured.
The presence of the virus can also be detected in dead birds. Dead crows, ravens, jays, hawks and owls that don’t show an obvious cause of death can be reported to Vector Control at 858-694-2888.
Vector Control will also take reports on green, uncared-for swimming pools, which mosquitoes use for breeding.

Food and Clothes Closet partners with county to reduce food waste

With the help of Ramona Food and Clothes Closet, Ramona is a pilot study for the county’s “Take a Bite out of Waste” program to reduce the amount of edible food that goes into landfills.

By businesses donating produce and other food that is still edible but has exceeded its shelf life to be distributed to families in need, the program becomes a win for residents, businesses — who can save money on disposal costs — and the environment, said a consultant working with the county on the project.

Manes & Trails: Cricket’s cloudy eye

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After pouring through pictures the night before searching for any evidence Cricket has had cataracts her entire life, Friday came and the appointment with the vet was late in the afternoon. First thing in the morning when it was just barely light enough to see outside, I grabbed my phone because it has a good camera on it and, if Cricket had a cloudy eye again, I was determined to get a picture of it. The day before she had a cloudy eye in the morning but it wasn’t present later in the day, so I needed proof if it happened again.

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