Ask Mr. Marketing: Don’t live by bread alone

By Rob Weinberg

Must I use multiple marketing tools?

—Brad Peck

If I only served bread at dinner, you’d probably not stay.

Just as a varied menu keeps a diner’s interest, a combination of marketing messages and tools captures a customer’s attention.

Yet there’s a 40 percent chance you’re relying on just one marketing tool to spread your message.

It may be publicity. Or public speaking. Or Facebook. It’s one thing that you’ve found works and you return to it repeatedly.

Yet no matter how successful that tool has previously been for you, one drum doesn’t make a symphony.

Now think about this— it typically takes 7 to 10 “touches” to get a sales prospect to buy something new. Reaching the same person through different avenues should mean you reel them in that much faster.

Your customers pay attention to lots of media. They enter sweepstakes, surf the web, read newspapers, and listen to radio.

Some of them EVEN watch television!

If you’re wondering why more of them aren’t calling you, consider this Deliver Magazine report: “Pairing communications efforts from two channels means you’re almost certain to experience an overall boost in your results.”

They observe that studies show organizations using mail to drive people to their website increase traffic and boost sales.

And they recommend if you combine mail with your social media marketing, you’re suddenly creating new fans for your brand, driving more interaction, and generally building a stronger relationship with the customer.

OK, Deliver has a bias toward direct mail because it’s published by the U.S. Postal Service, but its point is still legitimate. Multiply your avenues for communicating and you’ll improve your chances of finding and converting a sales prospect.

If you only use one marketing tool and your competitor uses several, guess who’ll grow faster?

But if you focus on one tool that’s always worked well for you and test new tools, too, you’ve just increased your own odds for success.

Some new tools will work. Others won’t. That’s why you need to keep testing new things until you find other vehicles that speak to your audience in a way they want to hear. Over time you’ll develop a healthier marketing mix—and healthier sales.

With that said, I wish you a week of profitable marketing.

Mr. Marketing can help you sort which marketing tools are best for your business. Contact him at www.askmrmarketing.com.

who’ll grow faster?

But if you focus on one tool that’s always worked well for you and test new tools, too, you’ve just increased your own odds for success.

Some new tools will work. Others won’t. That’s why you need to keep testing new things until you find other vehicles that speak to your audience in a way they want to hear. Over time you’ll develop a healthier marketing mix—and healthier sales.

With that said, I wish you a week of profitable marketing.

Mr. Marketing can help you sort which marketing tools are best for your business. Contact him at www.askmrmarketing.com.

Related posts:

  1. Ask Mr. Marketing: Been there. Done that.
  2. Ask Mr. Marketing: An ode to marketing
  3. Ask Mr. Marketing: Making video marketing work for you
  4. Ask Mr. Marketing: Planning for the coming year
  5. Ask Mr. Marketing: You call this selling?

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Posted by Staff on Mar 19 2012. Filed under Columnists, Columns. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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