Ramona Transportation Summit responses from Califorina Department of Transportation

Department of Transportation Funding:
   Since the passage of Senate Bill 45 in 1998, the State Highway Operation and Protection Program (SHOPP), is the primary funding program used by Caltrans to construct highway improvements. The SHOPP is a 4-year program updated every 2 years, currently covering Fiscal Years (FYs) 2010/11 through 2013/14. The 12 Caltrans Districts throughout the state submit projects ever 2 years to be included in the SHOPP. The general purpose of the SHOPP is to maintain the existing roadways and preserve the investment in the State Highway System. Funding for the SHOPP is through the State Highway Account, which receives funding through excise tax on gasoline and diesel fuel. The SHOPP contains eight major categories including (1) emergency, (2) traffic and worker safety, (3) mandates (ADA and storm water compliance),(4) bridge preservation, (5) roadway rehabilitation, (6) mobility (operational), (7) roadside, and (8) rest area/facilities.
   The funds allocated to the SHOPP are based on projections and the overall state budget. Districts have submitted candidate projects estimated at $4.0 billion per year with the actual SHOPP estimated to be funded at $1.5 billion per year statewide. As such, some SHOPP categories do not add any new projects for the next funding cycle, typically categories 6, 7 and 8. Due to severe State budget and funding constraints, the current SHOPP did not include funding for any of those project types. In general, projects that increase capacity, as outlined in SB 45, are the the responsibility of the regional planning associations such as SANDAG in the San Diego region.

Overall SR-67 Corridor Funding Outlook:
Near-Term
   • SHOPP – The current SHOPP Plan Update was approved in February 2010. The Department currently has nofunding allocation for mobility projects to address any operational improvements for the next 2 years.
   • County – Traffic Impact Fees (TIF) and/or Developer financed improvements may be available as projects are approved at the County level.
Mid-Term / Long – Term
   • SHOPP – Some minimal SHOPP funding for operational improvements might be available in the next cycle.
   • County – County Traffic Impact Fee (TIF) and/or developer-financed improvements may be available as the County approves projects.
   • SANDAG 2030 RTP, the RTP was adopted November 30, 2007. Funding under the Reasonably Expected Revenue forecast in the RTP which includes funding sources such as TransNet and the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP), shows the widening of SR-67 from a 2-lane highway to a 4-lane highway.
   • The SANDAG 2050 RTP, the new RTP is under development.
   • Other Federal/State or Regional Sources.

Mobility (Operational) Improvements:
SR-67 and Dye / Highland Valley Road Intersection
   The Department has recently modified the signal timing slightly during peak demand periods to maximize the operation of the intersection during peak periods on SR-67. The demand traffic volumes remain over 20% above the design capacity of the intersection so significant improvement to reducing delay and vehicle queuing can only be accomplished by a project to add capacity to the intersection.
   Caltrans has included this project on the future candidate list for consideration in the SHOPP, as a mobility project. The project proposed to add lanes and lengthen turn storage areas to reduce overall wait times and congestion at the intersection. This project is not currently funded and would compete with other mobility projects in the SHOPP for funding. The project would be considered for funding in the 2012 SHOPP at the earliest. The next step for the project is to begin the final engineering and environmental documentation.
   The County and Caltrans are currently reviewing preliminary proposals from developers in the Ramona area for improvements to the Highway Valley/Dye Road intersections. In addition, the County may have some TIF funding available for improvements to the intersection. The project-funding scenario will most likely be utilizing a combination of funds from the Department (state funds), the County, private developers, and other sources.
SR 67 and Archie Moore Road
   The Department implemented safety improvements in 2002 that significantly reduced collisions at this intersection. However, traffic is still congested on SR-67 near Archie Moore Road due to Highland Valley Road / Dye Road evening commute traffic. The recent signal timing change should improve this queuing. Additional improvement will occur once the Highland Valley/Dye intersection capacity is increased.
   Mid-term intersection improvements such as a developer proposed traffic signal may be eligible for County TIF funds and developer financed mitigation  improvements. Long-term improvements would most likely be part of the SANDAG funded 4-lane widening project.
SR 67 and Mussey Grade Road
   The intersection with SR 67 currently does not meet significant signal warrants to justify the installation of a traffic signal. Future growth may change this, as  development occurs off Mussey Grade Road. The intersection is on the County of San Diego’s General Circulation Element Master Plan to be signalized in the future.

Recently Completed Safety Projects and Campaigns:
   • Modifications to Archie Moore Road.
   • Added shoulder and median rumble strips throughout the corridor.
   • Widening the median in many locations to provide a median buffer with additional median rumble strips.
   • Adding dynamic speed feedback signs and establishing a daylight running headlight section.
   • Upgrading some guardrail crash cushions Corridor Campaigns
   The California Highway Patrol (CHP) and Caltrans have worked in partnership in the following safety corridor
campaigns:
   • “SR-67 Drive to Stay Alive” safety corridor campaign.
   • 2007 “Take Care Getting There, Drive 55 on 67” campaign.
   • CHP “Arrive Alive” campaign in 2009 that provided increased enforcement and targeted drivers under the influence of alcohol. Overall, DUI injury collisions were reduced by 28%. This effort was funded through a grant from the Office of Traffic Safety.

SANDAG Planning & Funding
Future Improvements (Long -Term):
   The widening of SR 67 from the two and three lane configuration to a four-lane highway is contained in the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). The SANDAG RTP shows the widening of SR-67 in two phases. The initial phase is from Mapleview Street to Scripps Poway Parkway for completion by 2020 and the section from Scripps Poway Parkway to Highland Valley/Dye Road for completion in 2030. This is based on the reasonably expected revenue plan. SANDAG is currently developing the 2050 RTP, which will be adopted in 2011 update.
   As part of SANDAG’s 2030 Regional Transportation Plan to widen SR-67 to a 4-lane conventional highway from just north of Mapleview Street to just south of Dye / Highland Valley Road, the Department finished a preliminary report in July 2009, known as a Project Study Report (PSR), outlining various design alternatives that may be considered as part of the next phase of the project, environmental documentation and final alternatives.
   The PSR outlines a preliminary “footprint” of the new facility and recommends analysis of various design alternatives and impacts prior to final design selection. The impacts include environmental impacts, future access to the facility, the possibility of median barrier in some locations, wider medians or buffers, turning lanes, and emergency access as well as evacuation in case of a natural disaster such as fire.

Meeting Follow-up Q & A
   All the questions provided on comment cards by the summit attendees are written and answered below.
   Questions are grouped into major categories. Each questions is typed as written with any changes in brackets [ ] for clarification. Supplemental information is available in the information sheet that was provided at the meeting and is above.

Questions regarding the Regional Transportation Plan and the widening of SR-67 to 4-lanes
   Q: Hwy 67 narrows twice between Dye Road & just south of Iron Mountain. Are there plans to create another lane both ways on this stretch of the road?
   Q: If the 67 plan goes through, when will it be done?
   Q: [When] is the widening [to] Scripps Poway Parkway?
   Q: What is the Mapleview to Scripps Poway Parkway widening plan?
   Q: If money for the widening of highway 67 is available, why do we need to wait until 2020 to have it widened?
   Q: What will happen to the section of 67 between Archie Moore Road [and] Dye Road when it is widened to 4-lanes?
   A: As part of SANDAG’s 2030 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) to widen SR-67 to a 4-lane conventional highway from just north of Mapleview Street to just south of Dye / Highland Valley Road, Caltrans finished a preliminary report in July 2009, known as a Project Study Report (PSR). The PSR outlines overall cost estimates and various design alternatives that may be considered as part of the next phase of the project, environmental documentation and final alternative selection. In general, the roadway will be widened to a 4-lane facility with a median and outside shoulders.
   The initial phase of the project is from Mapleview Street to Scripps Poway Parkway, shown in the plan for completion by 2020 and the section from Scripps Poway Parkway to Highland Valley/Dye Road for completion in 2030. This is based on the reasonably expected revenue plan (See Appendix A of the RTP). The RTP prioritizes projects using a wide range of categories and estimates the completion date from the project priority and funding projections. Federal and State funding comes from gasoline taxes. These funds are administered by Caltrans and SANDAG and are allocated either once a year or once every other year. The TransNet Program, which is funded through the 1/2 cent sales tax in San Diego County, is administered by SANDAG.
   SANDAG is currently developing the 2050 RTP, which is scheduled for adoption in 2011. Based on revenue forecasts and project priorities the scheduled dates for SR-67 could change in the new RTP. The 2030 RTP can be found @www.sandag.org

Questions regarding the improvements at Highland Valley/Dye Road and Mussey Grade Road
   Q: What progress has been made on the Dye Road – Route 67 intersection?
[Other options/considerations] – Remove the light/limit access or install a full cloverleaf.
   Q: Can the right turn lane on HWay 67 (heading north) be extended to allow more cars to queue, removing them from the through traffic?
   Q: It was stated that the Dye Road light area was 20% more traffic than capacity to handle it. What was the % before the light timing change?
   Q: Can the right turn lane on HWay 67 (heading north) be extended to allow more cars to queue, removing them from What progress has been made on the Dye Road – Route 67 intersection?
   Q: Why are the design solutions for the Hwy 67/Highland Valley Road so similar between the state and developers, yet the cost estimates and projected timelines so vastly different?
   Q: Has Caltrans explored a signal at the intersection of SR 67/Mussey Grade? If so, what is being done?
   A: The Department has recently modified the signal timing during the afternoon peak demand period to maximize the operation of the intersection on SR-67. This adjustment allows more through put in the northbound direction during the afternoon peak. Despite this, the demand traffic volume is 20% above the design capacity of the intersection. Delay for some of the moves will increase as delay for the northbound traffic has decreased. The only means of eliminating significant delay at the intersection will be by an improvement project that adds capacity to the intersection.  Caltrans has included the Highland Valley/Dye Intersection project on the future candidate list for consideration in the Caltrans SHOPP (more detail on the SHOPP is in the information sheet), which means that the project is not currently funded. In addition, the County and Caltrans are currently reviewing preliminary proposals from developers in the Ramona area for improvements to the  intersection. Some TIF or mitigation funding may be available for improvements to the intersection through the development process.

   Project estimates can vary somewhat depending on the costs that are including in the estimate. Caltrans estimates usually include the full project costs, including capital or construction cost, right-of-way costs for property acquisition, utility relocation costs, and support costs. Support costs include project development costs such as design and construction inspection. These costs are sometimes referred to as soft costs.
   The next step for the project is to begin the final engineering and environmental documentation. During this phase a final project alternative is selected along with an estimated cost. The preliminary project proposal is to add lanes, shoulders, and lengthen turn storage areas to reduce overall wait times and congestion at the intersection. Other alternative(s) might be considered if equal results could be achieved for a similar cost. A copy of the proposed project is attached.
   The SR 67 and Mussey grade intersection does not currently meet major traffic signal warrants to justify the installation of a traffic signal. Future growth may change this, as development occurs off Mussey Grade Road. Much of the delay and access impacts at the Mussey grade intersection are due to the congestion that occurs at the Highland/Dye intersection. Once an improvement project is completed at Highland Valley/Dye Road, it is anticipated that access to and from Mussey Grade Road will substantially improve. The intersection is on the County of San Diego’s General Circulation Element Master Plan to be signalized in the future.
Questions regarding agency roles and resources
   Q: Do you believe that Caltrans is committing available resources effectively to solve Hwy 67 problems? Especially in working with other agencies.
   Q: Are there too many “cooks” in the kitchen to get a near term solution to the Hwy 67 problems?
   Q: The PSR for SR 67 completed in July mentions the interim improvements of adding a median barrier. When will this be completed and which segments will be completed? What is the cost of the interim median barrier?
   A: As previously answered, Caltrans did complete a PSR in support of the RTP. Along with that, Caltrans remains active along the SR 67 corridor in route  surveillance, development reviews, and with CHP safety campaigns. This support is funded through the Traffic Operations Program within Caltrans and should be in place for the foreseeable future. This allows Caltrans to work with the community on operational issues and attend meetings such as the transportation summit.
   In addition, Caltrans has completed several projects over the last few years along the corridor including:
   • Modifications to Archie Moore Road.
   • Added shoulder and median rumble strips throughout the corridor.
   • Widening the median in many locations to provide a median buffer with additional median rumble strips.
   • Adding dynamic speed feedback signs and establishing a daylight running headlight section.
   • Upgrading some guardrail crash cushions
   Caltrans is also working on a PSR to study the feasibility of interim median barrier along the SR 67 corridor. This PSR is expected to be completed by the end of 2010. The PSR will cover which areas on SR 67 might be considered further for barrier, when that would be completed, and the estimated cost of implementation. As part of the study Caltrans is considering several factors, including emergency access issues, driveway accessibility, possible sight obstructions, drainage, traffic impacts, environmental impacts, and overall maintainability of placing a barrier that would remain in place until the planned widening by SANDAG. In general, barriers should only be placed when there is sufficient width to accommodate the barrier with inside and outside shoulders. Past experience has shown that when lanes and shoulders are narrowed to accommodate a median barrier, the overall number of collisions can increase at that those types of locations.
Miscellaneous Questions
   Q: How much money did Caltrans get from the “Stimulus” for Ramona projects? When will it get spent?
   A: The region did receive some “Economic Stimulus” funding for transportation projects. This funding was mandated for “Shovel Ready” projects. In the region, most of the highway transportation funding went to the SR 76 project in North County. This does free up funding that was planned for use on SR 76, for other projects in the region.
   Q: What are the collision rates on SR 67? How do these rates compare to the statewide averages?
   A: Caltrans uses traffic collision reports received from CHP and other law enforcement agencies to create a database that is used for analysis. State highways are divided into various groupings so that similar types of roadways can be compared statewide. For the highway portion of SR 67 from just north of Mapleview Intersection to SR 78, SR 67 is divided into a total of seventeen different groups. Using data over a 3-year period, four of those areas have a total collision rate that exceeds the statewide average and only two of those groups have a collision rate that is significantly above the statewide average. Generally, the total number of collisions is on a downward trend.
   Q’s: My property is on 67, what will happen to my property?
   A: For information on the possible project impacts on properties along the corridor, please contact Joe Hull at Caltrans at (619) 688-3142.

For the Ramona Sentinel article about the Ramona Transportation Summit held on June 9, see:
www.ramonasentinel.com/article/News/News/Transportation_Summit_panelists_stress_work_together/20522

Related posts:

  1. Planners host Transportation Summit
  2. Transportation Summit panelists stress ‘work together’
  3. Date set for transportation summit
  4. Planners want transportation summit
  5. SR-67/Dye improvements are uncertain

Short URL: http://www.ramonasentinel.com/?p=3767

Posted by admin on Jun 24 2010. Filed under Archive. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

Leave a Reply

Facebook

);